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Nat Rev Immunol. 2015 Dec;15(12):760-70. doi: 10.1038/nri3921.

STING: infection, inflammation and cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136, USA.

Abstract

The rapid detection of microbial agents is essential for the effective initiation of host defence mechanisms against infection. Understanding how cells detect cytosolic DNA to trigger innate immune gene transcription has important implications - not only for comprehending the immune response to pathogens but also for elucidating the causes of autoinflammatory disease involving the sensing of self-DNA and the generation of effective antitumour adaptive immunity. The discovery of the STING (stimulator of interferon genes)-controlled innate immune pathway, which mediates cytosolic DNA-induced signalling events, has recently provided important insights into these processes, opening the way for the development of novel immunization regimes, as well as therapies to treat autoinflammatory disease and cancer.

PMID:
26603901
PMCID:
PMC5004891
DOI:
10.1038/nri3921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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