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Alzheimers Dement. 2016 Apr;12(4):419-26. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.10.007. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Importance of home study visit capacity in dementia studies.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: pcrane@uw.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Department of Psychosocial & Community Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, Multiple Sclerosis Center, Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
6
Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
8
Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The importance of home research study visit capacity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) studies is unknown.

METHODS:

All evaluations are from the prospective Adult Changes in Thought study. Based on analyses of factors associated with volunteering for a new in-clinic initiative, we analyzed AD risk factors and the relevance of neuropathologic findings for dementia comparing all data including home visits, and in-clinic data only. We performed bootstrapping to determine whether differences were greater than expected by chance.

RESULTS:

Of the 1781 people enrolled during 1994-1996 with ≥1 follow-up, 1369 (77%) had in-clinic data, covering 61% of follow-up time. In-clinic data resulted in excluding 76% of incident dementia and AD cases. AD risk factors and the relevance of neuropathologic findings for dementia were both different with in-clinic data.

DISCUSSION:

Limiting data collection in AD studies to research clinics alone likely reduces power and also can lead to erroneous inferences.

KEYWORDS:

Bias; Cohort studies; Dementia; Home research study visits; Inference; Longitudinal studies; Missing data; Neuropathology; Prospective studies; Research clinic study visits

PMID:
26602628
PMCID:
PMC4841701
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2015.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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