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Biomed Opt Express. 2015 Oct 14;6(11):4365-77. doi: 10.1364/BOE.6.004365. eCollection 2015 Nov 1.

Reproducibility of optical coherence tomography airway imaging.

Author information

1
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ; Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
2
Department of Surgery, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Centre for Heart Lung Innovation, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
4
Department of Respirology, Bellvitge University Hospital, l'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
5
Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
6
Imaging Unit, Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ; Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a promising imaging technique to evaluate small airway remodeling. However, the short-term insertion-reinsertion reproducibility of OCT for evaluating the same bronchial pathway has yet to be established. We evaluated 74 OCT data sets from 38 current or former smokers twice within a single imaging session. Although the overall insertion-reinsertion airway wall thickness (WT) measurement coefficient of variation (CV) was moderate at 12%, much of the variability between repeat imaging was attributed to the observer; CV for repeated measurements of the same airway (intra-observer CV) was 9%. Therefore, reproducibility may be improved by introduction of automated analysis approaches suggesting that OCT has potential to be an in-vivo method for evaluating airway remodeling in future longitudinal and intervention studies.

KEYWORDS:

(170.0170) Medical optics and biotechnology; (170.4500) Optical coherence tomography

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