Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2016 Jan;25(1):127-34. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0822. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

Acrylamide and Glycidamide Hemoglobin Adducts and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study in Nonsmoking Postmenopausal Women from the EPIC Cohort.

Author information

1
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain.
2
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
3
Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
4
Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy.
5
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Lifestyle, Genes and Health: Integrative Trans-Generational Epidemiology, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
7
Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
8
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany.
9
Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain.
10
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain.
11
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa-BIODONOSTIA, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain.
12
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
13
CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain.
14
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
15
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom.
16
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Greece.
17
Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece.
18
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy.
19
Lombardy Cancer Registry Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
20
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy.
21
Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital-University of Turin and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Torino, Italy.
22
Dipartamiento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy.
23
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
24
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
25
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.
26
Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology Nutritional Research Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
27
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
28
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland.
29
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
30
Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acrylamide was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans (group 2A)" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the fourth cause of cancer mortality in women. Five epidemiological studies have evaluated the association between EOC risk and dietary acrylamide intake assessed using food frequency questionnaires, and one nested case-control study evaluated hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide (HbAA) and its metabolite glycidamide (HbGA) and EOC risk; the results of these studies were inconsistent.

METHODS:

A nested case-control study in nonsmoking postmenopausal women (334 cases, 417 controls) was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between HbAA, HbGA, HbAA+HbGA, and HbGA/HbAA and EOC and invasive serous EOC risk.

RESULTS:

No overall associations were observed between biomarkers of acrylamide exposure analyzed in quintiles and EOC risk; however, positive associations were observed between some middle quintiles of HbGA and HbAA+HbGA. Elevated but nonstatistically significant ORs for serous EOC were observed for HbGA and HbAA+HbGA (ORQ5vsQ1, 1.91; 95% CI, 0.96-3.81 and ORQ5vsQ1, 1.90; 95% CI, 0.94-3.83, respectively); however, no linear dose-response trends were observed.

CONCLUSION:

This EPIC nested case-control study failed to observe a clear association between biomarkers of acrylamide exposure and the risk of EOC or invasive serous EOC.

IMPACT:

It is unlikely that dietary acrylamide exposure increases ovarian cancer risk; however, additional studies with larger sample size should be performed to exclude any possible association with EOC risk.

PMID:
26598536
PMCID:
PMC5699214
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-15-0822
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center