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Stem Cell Res Ther. 2015 Nov 23;6:225. doi: 10.1186/s13287-015-0228-5.

Bioprocessing strategies for the large-scale production of human mesenchymal stem cells: a review.

Author information

1
Pharmaceutical Production Research Facility, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada.
2
Department of Surgery, McGill University Health Centre, 845 Rue Sherbrooke Quest, Montreal, QC, H3G 1A4, Canada.
3
Jewish General Hospital, 3755 Chemin de la Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC, H3T 1E2, Canada.
4
Pharmaceutical Production Research Facility, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, T2N 1N4, Canada. behie@ucalgary.ca.

Abstract

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), also called mesenchymal stromal cells, have been of great interest in regenerative medicine applications because of not only their differentiation potential but also their ability to secrete bioactive factors that can modulate the immune system and promote tissue repair. This potential has initiated many early-phase clinical studies for the treatment of various diseases, disorders, and injuries by using either hMSCs themselves or their secreted products. Currently, hMSCs for clinical use are generated through conventional static adherent cultures in the presence of fetal bovine serum or human-sourced supplements. However, these methods suffer from variable culture conditions (i.e., ill-defined medium components and heterogeneous culture environment) and thus are not ideal procedures to meet the expected future demand of quality-assured hMSCs for human therapeutic use. Optimizing a bioprocess to generate hMSCs or their secreted products (or both) promises to improve the efficacy as well as safety of this stem cell therapy. In this review, current media and methods for hMSC culture are outlined and bioprocess development strategies discussed.

PMID:
26597928
PMCID:
PMC4657237
DOI:
10.1186/s13287-015-0228-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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