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Ann Epidemiol. 2016 Jan;26(1):1-6.e1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.10.009. Epub 2015 Oct 30.

Race and ethnicity, neighborhood poverty and pediatric firearm hospitalizations in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY; Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston University, MA. Electronic address: kalesan@bu.edu.
2
Fort Lee High School, Fort Lee, NJ.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY.
4
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia Law School, New York, NY.
5
Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, Columbia University, New York, NY.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY; School of Public Health, Boston University, MA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To better understand the effects of race and/or ethnicity and neighborhood poverty on pediatric firearm injuries in the United States, we compared overall and intent-specific firearm hospitalizations (FH) with those of pedestrian motor vehicle crash hospitalizations (PMVH).

METHODS:

We used Nationwide Inpatient Sample data (1998-2011) among 0-15 year-olds in a 1:1 case-case study; 4725 FH and 4725 PMVH matched by age, year, and region.

RESULTS:

Risk of FH versus PMVH was 64% higher among black children, Odds ratio (OR) = 1.64, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 1.44-1.87, as compared to white children (P < .0001); this risk did not vary by neighborhood poverty (P interaction = .52). Risk of homicide FH versus PMVH was 842% higher among black (OR = 8.42, 95% CI = 6.27-11.3), 452% higher among Hispanics (OR = 4.52, 95% CI = 3.33-6.13) and 233% higher among other race (OR = 2.33, 95% CI = 1.52-3.59) compared to white children. There was a lower risk for unintentional FH among black OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.62-0.87, Hispanics (OR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.49-0.74), and other (OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.47-0.83) compared to whites. These intent-specific risks attributed to race did not vary by neighborhood affluence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Black children were at greater likelihood of FH compared to white children regardless of neighborhood economic status. Minority children had an increased likelihood of intentional FH and a decreased likelihood of unintentional FH as compared to white children irrespective of neighborhood income.

KEYWORDS:

Firearm; In-hospital mortality; Injury; Motor vehicle accidents; Pediatric; Trends

PMID:
26596958
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.10.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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