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Clin Neurophysiol. 2016 Feb;127(2):1436-1444. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2015.10.040. Epub 2015 Nov 10.

Effects of partial sleep deprivation on slow waves during non-rapid eye movement sleep: A high density EEG investigation.

Author information

1
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Psychiatry, Madison, WI, USA. Electronic address: dplante@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA.
3
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Psychiatry, Madison, WI, USA.
4
University of Minnesota Medical Scientist Training Program, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
5
Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Changes in slow waves during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in response to acute total sleep deprivation are well-established measures of sleep homeostasis. This investigation utilized high-density electroencephalography (hdEEG) to examine topographic changes in slow waves during repeated partial sleep deprivation.

METHODS:

Twenty-four participants underwent a 6-day sleep restriction protocol. Spectral and period-amplitude analyses of sleep hdEEG data were used to examine changes in slow wave energy, count, amplitude, and slope relative to baseline.

RESULTS:

Changes in slow wave energy were dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized for analysis, with widespread increases during sleep restriction and recovery when comparing data from the first portion of the sleep period, but restricted to recovery sleep if the entire sleep episode was considered. Period-amplitude analysis was less dependent on the quantity of NREM sleep utilized, and demonstrated topographic changes in the count, amplitude, and distribution of slow waves, with frontal increases in slow wave amplitude, numbers of high-amplitude waves, and amplitude/slopes of low amplitude waves resulting from partial sleep deprivation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Topographic changes in slow waves occur across the course of partial sleep restriction and recovery.

SIGNIFICANCE:

These results demonstrate a homeostatic response to partial sleep loss in humans.

KEYWORDS:

Electroencephalogram; Sleep deprivation; Sleep homeostasis; Slow wave; Synaptic plasticity

PMID:
26596212
PMCID:
PMC4747841
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2015.10.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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