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Food Chem. 2016 Apr 1;196:1101-7. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.10.037. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Cooking techniques improve the levels of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity in kale and red cabbage.

Author information

1
Department of Biosciences, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), Silva Jardim Street, 136, Vila Mathias, 11015-020 Santos City, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: danicarisa@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Food Science, Faculty of Food Engineering, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), 13083-862 Campinas City, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: azmercadante@gmail.com.
3
Department of Biosciences, Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP), Silva Jardim Street, 136, Vila Mathias, 11015-020 Santos City, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: veriderosso@yahoo.com.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different home cooking techniques (boiling, steaming, and stir-frying) in kale and red cabbage, on the levels of bioactive compounds (carotenoids, anthocyanins and phenolic compounds) determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array and mass spectrometry detectors (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)), and on the antioxidant activity evaluated by ABTS, ORAC and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. The steaming technique resulted in a significant increase in phenolic content in kale (86.1%; p<0.001) whereas in red cabbage it was significantly reduced (34.6%; p<0.001). In the kale, steaming resulted in significant increases in antioxidant activity levels in all of the evaluation methods. In the red cabbage, boiling resulted in a significant increase in antioxidant activity using the ABTS assay but resulted in a significant decrease using the ORAC assay. According to the CAA assay, the stir-fried sample displayed the highest levels of antioxidant activity.

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanins; Antioxidant activity; Carotenoids; Cooked vegetable; Cooking technique; Phenolic compounds

PMID:
26593594
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.10.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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