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J Pediatr Psychol. 2016 Aug;41(7):786-98. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsv105. Epub 2015 Nov 19.

Diversion of ADHD Stimulants and Victimization Among Adolescents.

Author information

1
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, University of Michigan Injury Center, University of Michigan qen@umich.edu.
2
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan.
3
School of Nursing, University of Michigan School of Public Health, University of Michigan.
4
Institute for Clinical and Health Research, University of Michigan Injury Center, University of Michigan Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Michigan.
5
Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan School of Nursing, University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Research Center, University of Michigan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether a recent prescription for stimulant medication is associated with peer victimization among youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHODS:

Data from 4,965 adolescents attending five public schools who completed an annual web survey over 4 years were used to examine recent stimulant medication prescription and self-reported frequent victimization.

RESULTS:

Adolescents with ADHD and recent stimulant prescription reported more victimization than those without ADHD, but similar to adolescents with ADHD and no recent prescription. Adolescents with ADHD and past 12-month diversion of their prescribed stimulants were at greatest risk of 12-month frequent victimization compared with adolescents without ADHD and adolescents with ADHD but no recent prescription. Youth approached to divert reported more victimization than youth not approached. Youth who diverted reported more victimization than those who did not divert.

CONCLUSIONS:

Close parent-prescriber collaboration is needed to ensure effective medical treatment for ADHD without greater risk for victimization and treatment failure.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent(s); attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder; crime and violence; prescription stimulant(s); risk behaviors

PMID:
26590265
PMCID:
PMC4945774
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jsv105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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