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Cell Rep. 2015 Nov 24;13(8):1538-44. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.10.028. Epub 2015 Nov 12.

Burn Induces Browning of the Subcutaneous White Adipose Tissue in Mice and Humans.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.
2
Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada; Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada.
3
Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada; Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada; Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada. Electronic address: marc.jeschke@sunnybrook.ca.

Abstract

Burn is accompanied by long-lasting immuno-metabolic alterations referred to as hypermetabolism that are characterized by a considerable increase in resting energy expenditure and substantial whole-body catabolism. In burned patients, the length and magnitude of the hypermetabolic state is the highest of all patients and associated with profoundly increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the mechanisms involved in hypermetabolism are essentially unknown. We hypothesized that the adipose tissue plays a central role for the induction and persistence of hypermetabolism post-burn injury. Here, we show that burn induces a switch in the phenotype of the subcutaneous fat from white to beige, with associated characteristics such as increased mitochondrial mass and UCP1 expression. Our results further demonstrate the significant role of catecholamines and interleukin-6 in this process. We conclude that subcutaneous fat remodeling and browning represent an underlying mechanism that explains the elevated energy expenditure in burn-induced hypermetabolism.

PMID:
26586436
PMCID:
PMC4662886
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.10.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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