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Science. 2015 Dec 11;350(6266):1379-83. doi: 10.1126/science.aab0892. Epub 2015 Nov 19.

Oscillatory stress stimulation uncovers an Achilles' heel of the yeast MAPK signaling network.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA.
2
Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Center for Quantitative Biology, and Peking-Tsinghua Center for Life Sciences, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, School of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. lim@cmp.ucsf.edu pwei@pku.edu.cn.
3
Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), UCSF, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA. lim@cmp.ucsf.edu pwei@pku.edu.cn.

Abstract

Cells must interpret environmental information that often changes over time. In our experiment, we systematically monitored the growth of yeast cells under various frequencies of oscillating osmotic stress. Growth was severely inhibited at a particular resonance frequency, at which cells show hyperactivated transcriptional stress responses. This behavior represents a sensory misperception: The cells incorrectly interpret oscillations as a staircase of ever-increasing osmolarity. The misperception results from the capacity of the osmolarity-sensing mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) network to retrigger with sequential osmotic stresses. Although this feature is critical for coping with natural challenges, such as continually increasing osmolarity, it results in a trade-off of fragility to non-natural oscillatory inputs that match the retriggering time. These findings demonstrate the value of non-natural dynamic perturbations in exposing hidden sensitivities of cellular regulatory networks.

PMID:
26586187
PMCID:
PMC4721531
DOI:
10.1126/science.aab0892
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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