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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 Jun;137(6):1788-1795.e9. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.037. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

Changes in IgE sensitization and total IgE levels over 20 years of follow-up.

Author information

1
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: a.amaral@imperial.ac.uk.
2
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom; Department of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.
3
School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
5
Department of Public Health and Pediatrics, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.
6
Division of Respiratory Diseases, IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation-University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
7
Unit of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Verona, Verona, Italy.
8
Department of Pulmonology, Division of Allergy, Arnaud de Villeneuve Hospital, CHU Montpellier, and EPAR Team-UMR-S 1136 INSERM, Paris, France.
9
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
10
Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland; Department of Respiratory Medicine and Sleep, Landspitali-The National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
11
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum, Munich, Germany; Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Inner City Clinic, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität of Munich, Munich, Germany.
12
Epidemiological Surveillance Section, Directorate General of Public Health, Department of Health of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain.
13
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
14
Tartu University Hospital, Lung Clinic, Tartu, Estonia.
15
Department of Publich Health and Community Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
16
Unit of Clinical Management of Pneumology and Allergy, University Hospital of Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
17
Unit of Pneumology, University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, Spain.
18
INSERM UMR1152, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot Paris 7, UMR1152, Paris, France.
19
Institute and Outpatient Clinic for Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Inner City Clinic, University Hospital Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität of Munich, and the German Center for Lung Research, Munich, Germany.
20
Pédiatrie, Pole Couple Enfants, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble, France; INSERM U823, Institut Albert Bonniot, Grenoble, France; Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, France.
21
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
22
INSERM U897, Institute of Public health and Epidemiology, Bordeaux University, Bordeaux, France.
23
Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
24
Department of Pneumology, Galdakao Hospital, Galdakao, Spain.
25
Departments of Experimental Immunology and of Otorhinolaryngology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
26
Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
27
Epidemiology and Social Medicine and the StatUA Statistics Centre, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium.
28
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
29
Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cross-sectional studies have reported a lower prevalence of sensitization in older adults, but few longitudinal studies have examined whether this is an aging or a year-of-birth cohort effect.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to assess changes in sensitization and total IgE levels in a cohort of European adults as they aged over a 20-year period.

METHODS:

Levels of serum specific IgE to common aeroallergens (house dust mite, cat, and grass) and total IgE levels were measured in 3206 adults from 25 centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey on 3 occasions over 20 years. Changes in sensitization and total IgE levels were analyzed by using regression analysis corrected for potential differences in laboratory equipment and by using inverse sampling probability weights to account for nonresponse.

RESULTS:

Over the 20-year follow-up, the prevalence of sensitization to at least 1 of the 3 allergens decreased from 29.4% to 24.8% (-4.6%; 95% CI, -7.0% to -2.1%). The prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite (-4.3%; 95% CI, -6.0% to -2.6%) and cat (-2.1%; 95% CI, -3.6% to -0.7%) decreased more than sensitization to grass (-0.6%; 95% CI, -2.5% to 1.3%). Age-specific prevalence of sensitization to house dust mite and cat did not differ between year-of-birth cohorts, but sensitization to grass was most prevalent in the most recent ones. Overall, total IgE levels decreased significantly (geometric mean ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68) at all ages in all year-of-birth cohorts.

CONCLUSION:

Aging was associated with lower levels of sensitization, especially to house dust mite and cat, after the age of 20 years.

KEYWORDS:

Allergens; IgE; aging; cohort study; epidemiology; immunosenescence; longitudinal analysis; sensitization

PMID:
26586040
PMCID:
PMC4889785
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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