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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2015 Dec 1;157:166-73. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.10.022. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

The role of dyad-level factors in shaping sexual and drug-related HIV/STI risks among sex workers with intimate partners.

Author information

1
Gender & Sexual Health Initiative, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6.
2
Gender & Sexual Health Initiative, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6; Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3.
3
Gender & Sexual Health Initiative, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6; Urban Health Research Initiative, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6.
4
Gender & Sexual Health Initiative, BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital, 608-1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6Z 1Y6; Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z3. Electronic address: kdeering@cfenet.ubc.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite high HIV burden among sex workers (SWs) globally, and relatively high prevalence of client condom use, research on potential HIV/STI risk pathways of intimate partnerships is limited. This study investigated partner/dyad-level factors associated with inconsistent condom use among SWs with intimate partners in Vancouver, Canada.

METHODS:

Baseline data (2010-2013) were drawn from a community-based prospective cohort of women SWs. Multivariable generalized estimating equations logistic regression examined dyad-level factors associated with inconsistent condom use (<100% in last six months) with up to three male intimate partners per SW. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were reported (AOR[95%CI]).

RESULTS:

Overall, 369 SWs reported having at least one intimate partner, with 70.1% reporting inconsistent condom use. Median length of partnerships was 1.8 years, with longer duration linked to inconsistent condom use. In multivariable analysis, dyad factors significantly associated with increased odds of inconsistent condom use included: having a cohabiting (5.43[2.53-11.66]) or non-cohabiting intimate partner (2.15[1.11-4.19]) (versus casual partner), providing drugs (3.04[1.47-6.30]) or financial support to an intimate partner (2.46[1.05-5.74]), physical intimate partner violence (2.20[1.17-4.12]), and an intimate partner providing physical safety (2.08[1.11-3.91]); non-injection drug use was associated with a 68% reduced odds (0.32[0.17-0.60]).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study highlights the complex role of dyad-level factors in shaping sexual and drug-related HIV/STI risk pathways for SWs from intimate partners. Couple and gender-focused interventions efforts are needed to reduce HIV/STI risks to SWs through intimate partnerships. This research supports further calls for integrated violence and HIV prevention within broader sexual/reproductive health efforts for SWs.

KEYWORDS:

Condom use; Drug use; HIV prevention; Intimate partners; Risk environment; Sex workers

PMID:
26585612
PMCID:
PMC4678956
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2015.10.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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