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Eur J Nutr. 2017 Mar;56(2):509-519. doi: 10.1007/s00394-015-1096-6. Epub 2015 Nov 18.

Increased dietary levels of α-linoleic acid inhibit mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

Author information

1
Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud de Córdoba (INICSA-CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina.
2
Instituto de Biología Celular, Cátedra de Biología Celular, Histología y Embriología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padua, Largo E. Meneghetti 2, 35131, Padua, Italy.
4
Department of Pharmacological and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Milan, Via Balzaretti 9, 20133, Milan, Italy.
5
Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Italian National Research Council, Via Ugo la Malfa 153, 90146, Palermo, Italy.
6
Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Salud de Córdoba (INICSA-CONICET), Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina. mirtavalentich@gmail.com.
7
Instituto de Biología Celular, Cátedra de Biología Celular, Histología y Embriología, Facultad de Ciencias Médicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Enrique Barros s/n. Ciudad Universitaria, 5000, Córdoba, Argentina. mirtavalentich@gmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to determine whether α-linolenic acid (ALA ω-3 fatty acid) enriched diet affects growth parameters when applied to a syngeneic model of mammary carcinoma.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

BALB/c mice were divided and fed with: 1) a chia oil diet, rich in ALA or 2) a corn oil diet, rich in linoleic acid (LA ω-6 fatty acid). Mice were subcutaneously inoculated with a tumor cell line LM3, derived from a murine mammary adenocarcinoma.

RESULTS:

After 35 days, tumor incidence, weight, volume and metastasis number were lower in the ALA-fed mice, while tumor latency time was higher, and the release of pro-tumor metabolites derived from ω-6 fatty acids decreased in the tumor. Compared to the control group, a lower number of mitosis, a higher number of apoptotic bodies and higher T-lymphocyte infiltration were consistently observed in the ALA group. An ALA-rich diet decreased the estrogen receptor (ER) α expression, a recognized breast cancer promotor while showing an opposite effect on ERβ in tumor lysates.

CONCLUSION:

These data support the anticancer effect of an ALA-enriched diet, which might be used as a dietary strategy in breast cancer prevention.

KEYWORDS:

Chia oil; Estrogen receptor; LOXs metabolites; Mammary carcinoma; α-linolenic acid (ALA)

PMID:
26582578
DOI:
10.1007/s00394-015-1096-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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