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Nat Commun. 2015 Nov 19;6:8856. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9856.

Histone H1-mediated epigenetic regulation controls germline stem cell self-renewal by modulating H4K16 acetylation.

Author information

1
School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
2
Research Center for Translational Medicine at East Hospital, School of Life Sciences and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092/200120, China.
3
College of Bioengineering, Hubei University of Technology, Wuhan 430068, China.
4
Tsinghua Fly Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
5
Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 102206, China.
6
Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, College of Medicine, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, Texas 77843, USA.
7
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
8
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, Missouri 64110, USA.
9
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas School of Medicine, Kansas City, Kansas 66160, USA.

Abstract

Epigenetics plays critical roles in controlling stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Histone H1 is one of the most critical chromatin regulators, but its role in adult stem cell regulation remains unclear. Here we report that H1 is intrinsically required in the regulation of germline stem cells (GSCs) in the Drosophila ovary. The loss of H1 from GSCs causes their premature differentiation through activation of the key GSC differentiation factor bam. Interestingly, the acetylated H4 lysine 16 (H4K16ac) is selectively augmented in the H1-depleted GSCs. Furthermore, overexpression of mof reduces H1 association on chromatin. In contrast, the knocking down of mof significantly rescues the GSC loss phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that H1 functions intrinsically to promote GSC self-renewal by antagonizing MOF function. Since H1 and H4K16 acetylation are highly conserved from fly to human, the findings from this study might be applicable to stem cells in other systems.

PMID:
26581759
PMCID:
PMC4673494
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms9856
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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