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Sci Rep. 2015 Nov 19;5:16867. doi: 10.1038/srep16867.

Undernourishment in utero Primes Hepatic Steatosis in Adult Mice Offspring on an Obesogenic Diet; Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu 431-3192 Japan.
2
Department of Preemptive Medicine and Metabolism, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan.
3
Department of Organ Network and Metabolism, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan.
4
Japan Science and Technology Agency, PRESTO, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Molecular Endocrinology and Metabolism, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8510, Japan.
6
Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, CREST, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

In order to investigate the possible involvement of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the developmental origins of hepatic steatosis associated with undernourishment in utero, we herein employed a fetal undernourishment mouse model by maternal caloric restriction in three cohorts; cohort 1) assessment of hepatic steatosis and the ER stress response at 9 weeks of age (wks) before a high fat diet (HFD), cohort 2) assessment of hepatic steatosis and the ER stress response on a HFD at 17 wks, cohort 3) assessment of hepatic steatosis and the ER stress response at 22 wks on a HFD after the alleviation of ER stress with a chemical chaperone, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), from 17 wks to 22 wks. Undernourishment in utero significantly deteriorated hepatic steatosis and led to the significant integration of the ER stress response on a HFD at 17 wks. The alleviation of ER stress by the TUDCA treatment significantly improved the parameters of hepatic steatosis in pups with undernourishment in utero, but not in those with normal nourishment in utero at 22 wks. These results suggest the pivotal involvement of the integration of ER stress in the developmental origins of hepatic steatosis in association with undernourishment in utero.

PMID:
26581663
PMCID:
PMC4652266
DOI:
10.1038/srep16867
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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