Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Nov 13;12(11):14571-88. doi: 10.3390/ijerph121114571.

Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. boyeon02@gmail.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. eunil@korea.ac.kr.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. sjstars7@korea.ac.kr.
4
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. seulkeeheo@naver.com.
5
Graduate School of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. jkh861114@nate.com.
6
Graduate School of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea. lilykim1011@gmail.com.
7
Department of Statistics, College of Natural Science, Sungshin Women's University, 249-1, Dongseon-dong 3-ga, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02844, Korea. mansikpark@sungshin.ac.kr.

Abstract

Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004-2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07-1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04-1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas.

KEYWORDS:

Medicaid; age; gender; hospital admissions; myocardial infarction; socioeconomic status; temperature

PMID:
26580643
PMCID:
PMC4661668
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph121114571
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center