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World Neurosurg. 2016 Apr;88:631-9. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2015.11.003. Epub 2015 Nov 11.

Propranolol Treatment of Cavernous Malformations with Symptomatic Hemorrhage.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Electronic address: Neuropub@dignityhealth.org.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cerebral cavernous malformations are more common than generally thought, affecting approximately 1 in every 250 adults. Most of these lesions are asymptomatic or have a relatively benign course, but a small minority behave aggressively and present with recurrent episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage. A safe and effective medical treatment option for the management of this latter group would be useful. Propranolol has recently been shown to be effective in the treatment of infantile hemangioma, a close pathologic counterpart of cavernous malformations. These results suggest a potential role for propranolol treatment in the management of patients with symptomatic cavernous malformations.

METHODS:

Low-dose propranolol (20 mg, three times daily) was used to treat 2 adult female patients in their mid- to late fifties, both of whom had symptomatic cavernous malformations and a history of repeated hemorrhage. Serial magnetic resonance imaging studies after the initiation of propranolol demonstrated regression of the lesions and no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage.

CONCLUSIONS:

Propranolol may offer a safe and effective treatment for patients who have cavernous malformations with symptomatic hemorrhage. Additional studies are needed to confirm these findings.

KEYWORDS:

Beta-blockers; Cavernous malformations; Cerebral cavernous malformations; Hemorrhage; Propranolol; Symptomatic

PMID:
26578351
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2015.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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