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J Occup Environ Hyg. 2016;13(4):275-83. doi: 10.1080/15459624.2015.1116693.

Insights from two industrial hygiene pilot e-cigarette passive vaping studies.

Author information

1
a Safety, Health and Environmental, Altria Client Services Inc. , Richmond , Virginia.
2
b Regulatory Affairs, Altria Client Services Inc. , Richmond , Virginia.
3
c Retired; Altria Client Services Inc. , Richmond , Virginia.

Abstract

While several reports have been published using research methods of estimating exposure risk to e-cigarette vapors in nonusers, only two have directly measured indoor air concentrations from vaping using validated industrial hygiene sampling methodology. Our first study was designed to measure indoor air concentrations of nicotine, menthol, propylene glycol, glycerol, and total particulates during the use of multiple e-cigarettes in a well-characterized room over a period of time. Our second study was a repeat of the first study, and it also evaluated levels of formaldehyde. Measurements were collected using active sampling, near real-time and direct measurement techniques. Air sampling incorporated industrial hygiene sampling methodology using analytical methods established by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Active samples were collected over a 12-hr period, for 4 days. Background measurements were taken in the same room the day before and the day after vaping. Panelists (n = 185 Study 1; n = 145 Study 2) used menthol and non-menthol MarkTen prototype e-cigarettes. Vaping sessions (six, 1-hr) included 3 prototypes, with total number of puffs ranging from 36-216 per session. Results of the active samples were below the limit of quantitation of the analytical methods. Near real-time data were below the lowest concentration on the established calibration curves. Data from this study indicate that the majority of chemical constituents sampled were below quantifiable levels. Formaldehyde was detected at consistent levels during all sampling periods. These two studies found that indoor vaping of MarkTen prototype e-cigarette does not produce chemical constituents at quantifiable levels or background levels using standard industrial hygiene collection techniques and analytical methods.

KEYWORDS:

Atmosphere concentrations; e-cigarette; passive vaping

PMID:
26576834
DOI:
10.1080/15459624.2015.1116693
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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