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Plant Physiol. 2016 Jan;170(1):338-53. doi: 10.1104/pp.15.01540. Epub 2015 Nov 16.

Novel Vein Patterns in Arabidopsis Induced by Small Molecules.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (F.C., T.N.);Bloomfield Industries, Inc., Staten Island, New York 10314 (A.D.); andDepartment of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California 92507 (S.C.).
2
Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (F.C., T.N.);Bloomfield Industries, Inc., Staten Island, New York 10314 (A.D.); andDepartment of Botany and Plant Sciences, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, California 92507 (S.C.) timothy.nelson@yale.edu.

Abstract

The critical role of veins in transporting water, nutrients, and signals suggests that some key regulators of vein formation may be genetically redundant and, thus, undetectable by forward genetic screens. To identify such regulators, we screened more than 5000 structurally diverse small molecules for compounds that alter Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf vein patterns. Many compound-induced phenotypes were observed, including vein networks with an open reticulum; decreased or increased vein number and thickness; and misaligned, misshapen, or nonpolar vascular cells. Further characterization of several individual active compounds suggests that their targets include hormone cross talk, hormone-dependent transcription, and PIN-FORMED trafficking.

PMID:
26574596
PMCID:
PMC4704596
DOI:
10.1104/pp.15.01540
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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