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Subst Abus. 2016 Jul-Sep;37(3):412-418. Epub 2015 Nov 16.

Misprescribing controlled substances: An evaluation of a professional development program.

Author information

1
a Vanderbilt University Medical Center , Nashville , Tennessee , USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Controlled prescription drug (CPD) abuse has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Most physicians attending a 3-day continuing medical education (CME) professional development program (PDP) lack training in identifying risk and in managing patients who misuse CPDs. To address this issue, the authors conducted an evaluation of a PDP that trains physicians on proper prescribing, identifying substance abuse, utilizing screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT), and implementing motivational interviewing (MI).

METHODS:

The authors conducted a program evaluation to assess the efficacy and impact of the PDP on physicians' knowledge and prescribing behaviors.

RESULTS:

Participants (N = 174) were typically middle-aged (average age of 53 years), male (89%), and physicians (82%) and other health care professionals (18%). Many physicians practice in solo primary care settings (46%). Course evaluations were completed by n = 155 (89%) participants who rated the course and presenters highly (mean 4.8/5 respectively). Physicians' knowledge scores on pre/post assessments increased significantly: pretest (M = 58.7, SD = 13.12) and posttest (M = 78.28, SD = 9.83) (t(173) = 20.06, P ≤ .0001, 95% confidence interval, CI: [-21.51, -17.65]). Almost half of the participants, n = 83/174 (48%), completed the follow-up survey, and 93% agreed/strongly agreed (A/SA) they made professional practice changes. Of participants practicing with an active DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) registration (n = 57), most agreed/strongly agreed they implemented changes to align their practices with current guidelines (89%), used CPD more appropriately (87%), implemented office policies on prescribing (81%), identified and referred more substance abuse patients to treatment (80%), shared new information/experience from course with other 25 health professionals (93%), and felt the course positively impacted their behaviors personally and professionally (90% and 96%, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first known study evaluating a PDP in this population. Results demonstrated participant satisfaction and improvement in prescribers' knowledge and self-reported prescribing behaviors. However, further study is needed to assess actual clinical practice changes, direct impact on patient outcomes, and rates of recidivism.

KEYWORDS:

Continuing medical education; Kirkpatrick Model; SBIRT; controlled prescription drugs; misprescribing; physician; professional development program; program evaluation

PMID:
26569508
DOI:
10.1080/08897077.2015.1096318
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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