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Nutrients. 2015 Nov 11;7(11):9309-24. doi: 10.3390/nu7115463.

Association of Dietary Vitamin A and β-Carotene Intake with the Risk of Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19 Publications.

Author information

1
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. nayu888@yeah.net.
2
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. xinmingsu123@yeah.net.
3
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. zanfengwang123@yeah.net.
4
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. bingdai123@yeah.net.
5
Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, No.155 Nanjing North Street, He-ping District, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, China. kangjian58@163.com.

Abstract

Whether dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intake protect against lung cancer risk is not clear. Therefore, we performed this meta-analysis to investigate the association between them. The related articles were searched using the databases PubMed and the Web of Knowledge up to May 2015. We used the random-effect model to estimate the relative risk (RR) and their 95% CI. Small-study effect was assessed using Egger's test. In total, 19 studies comprising 10,261 lung cancer cases met the inclusion criteria. The pooled RR and their 95% CI was 0.855 (0.739-0.989) for higher category of dietary vitamin A intake and lung cancer risk, especially among Asian populations and in the cohort studies. Evidence from 18 studies suggested that higher category of dietary β-carotene intake could reduce lung cancer risk (0.768 (0.675-0.874)).The associations were also significant in American and Asian populations. In conclusions, higher category of dietary β-carotene and vitamin A intakes could reduce the risk of lung cancer. However, the dose-response analysis was not performed due to the limited data in each individual study. Due to this limitation, further studies with detailed dose, cases and person-years for β-carotene and vitamin A of each category are wanted to assess this dose-response association.

KEYWORDS:

lung cancer; meta-analysis; vitamin A; β-carotene

PMID:
26569298
PMCID:
PMC4663591
DOI:
10.3390/nu7115463
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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