Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Rep. 2015 Nov 3;13(5):924-32. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.09.050. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

Serotonin Promotes Development and Regeneration of Spinal Motor Neurons in Zebrafish.

Author information

1
Centre for Neuroregeneration, Edinburgh Medical School, Biomedical Sciences, The Chancellor's Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK.
2
Centre for Neuroregeneration, Edinburgh Medical School, Biomedical Sciences, The Chancellor's Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK; Technische Universität Dresden, DFG-Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 105, 01307 Dresden, Germany.
3
Centre for Neuroregeneration, Edinburgh Medical School, Biomedical Sciences, The Chancellor's Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK; Euan MacDonald Centre for MND Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: catherina.becker@ed.ac.uk.
4
Centre for Neuroregeneration, Edinburgh Medical School, Biomedical Sciences, The Chancellor's Building, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK; Euan MacDonald Centre for MND Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4SB, UK. Electronic address: thomas.becker@ed.ac.uk.

Abstract

In contrast to mammals, zebrafish regenerate spinal motor neurons. During regeneration, developmental signals are re-deployed. Here, we show that, during development, diffuse serotonin promotes spinal motor neuron generation from pMN progenitor cells, leaving interneuron numbers unchanged. Pharmacological manipulations and receptor knockdown indicate that serotonin acts at least in part via 5-HT1A receptors. In adults, serotonin is supplied to the spinal cord mainly (90%) by descending axons from the brain. After a spinal lesion, serotonergic axons degenerate caudal to the lesion but sprout rostral to it. Toxin-mediated ablation of serotonergic axons also rostral to the lesion impaired regeneration of motor neurons only there. Conversely, intraperitoneal serotonin injections doubled numbers of new motor neurons and proliferating pMN-like progenitors caudal to the lesion. Regeneration of spinal-intrinsic serotonergic interneurons was unaltered by these manipulations. Hence, serotonin selectively promotes the development and adult regeneration of motor neurons in zebrafish.

PMID:
26565906
PMCID:
PMC4635313
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.09.050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center