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J Biol Chem. 2016 Jan 15;291(3):1243-50. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M115.687376. Epub 2015 Nov 12.

MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

Author information

1
From the Center for Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases and Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and.
2
From the Center for Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases and.
3
the School of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China.
4
Center for Cancer and Stem Cell Biology, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and liyugene@hit.edu.cn.
5
From the Center for Infectious and Inflammatory Diseases and dzhang@ibt.tamhsc.edu.

Abstract

Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

KEYWORDS:

Toll-like receptor (TLR); autophagy; bacterial adhesion; innate immunity; phagocytosis

PMID:
26565030
PMCID:
PMC4714212
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M115.687376
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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