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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Nov 17;66(20):2189-2196. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2015.09.014.

Early and Late Outcomes of Surgical Treatment in Carcinoid Heart Disease.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Electronic address: connolly.heidi@mayo.edu.
2
Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
3
Division of Cardiovascular Anesthesia, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
4
Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
5
Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
6
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.
7
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Symptoms and survival of patients with carcinoid syndrome have improved, but development of carcinoid heart disease (CaHD) continues to decrease survival.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to analyze patient outcomes after valve surgery for CaHD during a 27-year period at 1 institution to determine early and late outcomes and opportunities for improved patient care.

METHODS:

We retrospectively studied the short-term and long-term outcomes of all consecutive patients with CaHD who underwent valve replacement at our institution between 1985 and 2012.

RESULTS:

The records of 195 patients with CaHD were analyzed. Pre-operative New York Heart Association class was III or IV in 125 of 178 patients (70%). All had tricuspid valve replacement (159 bioprostheses, 36 mechanical), and 157 underwent a pulmonary valve operation. Other concomitant operations included mitral valve procedure (11%), aortic valve procedure (9%), patent foramen ovale or atrial septal defect closure (23%), cardiac metastasectomies or biopsy (4%), and simultaneous coronary artery bypass (11%). There were 20 perioperative deaths (10%); after 2000, perioperative mortality was 6%. Survival rates (95% confidence intervals) at 1, 5, and 10 years were 69% (63% to 76%), 35% (28% to 43%), and 24% (18% to 32%), respectively. Overall mortality was associated with older age, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and tobacco use; 75% of survivors had symptomatic improvement at follow-up. Presymptomatic valve operation was not associated with late survival benefit.

CONCLUSIONS:

Operative mortality associated with valve replacement surgery for CaHD has decreased. Symptomatic and survival benefit is noted in most patients when CaHD is managed by an experienced multidisciplinary team.

KEYWORDS:

carcinoid syndrome; right-sided heart failure; valve replacement

PMID:
26564596
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2015.09.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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