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Am J Public Health. 2016 Jan;106(1):103-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2015.302868. Epub 2015 Nov 12.

Patterns and Trends of Newly Diagnosed HIV Infections Among Adults and Adolescents in Correctional and Noncorrectional Facilities, United States, 2008-2011.

Author information

1
Albert E. Barskey, Angela Hernandez, and Lorena Espinoza are with Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA. Aruna Surendera Babu is with ICF International, Corporate Square NE, Suite 370, Atlanta.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We aimed to determine whether the patterns and trends of HIV infections newly diagnosed within correctional and noncorrectional facilities differ.

METHODS:

We classified persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection in the United States between 2008 and 2011 (n = 181,710) by correctional and noncorrectional facilities where diagnoses were first made, and stratified by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, transmission category, and diagnosis year.

RESULTS:

An estimated 9187 persons were newly diagnosed with HIV infection in 2008 to 2011 while incarcerated, representing approximately 5.1% of the 181,710 HIV infections diagnosed in the United States during this period. Of these incarcerated persons, 84% were male, 30% were aged 30 to 39 years, 59% were Black/African American, and 51% of the men had been exposed through male-to-male sexual contact. Yearly numbers of diagnoses declined by 9.9% in correctional versus 0.3% in noncorrectional facilities. The percentage with a late HIV diagnosis was significantly lower in correctional than in noncorrectional facilities (prevalence ratio = 0.52; 95% confidence interval = 0.49, 0.55).

CONCLUSIONS:

Initial HIV diagnosis occurred sooner after HIV infection onset in correctional than in noncorrectional settings, pointing to the need for efficient referral systems after release.

PMID:
26562113
PMCID:
PMC4695944
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2015.302868
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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