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J Virol. 2015 Nov 11;90(2):630-5. doi: 10.1128/JVI.01433-15. Print 2016 Jan 15.

Zoonotic Potential of Simian Arteriviruses.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
2
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.
3
Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland, USA.
4
Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA.
5
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Washington University School of Medicine, and Department of Anthropology, Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.
6
Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, New York, USA.
7
Tulane National Primate Research Center, Covington, Louisiana, USA Department of Tropical Medicine, Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.
8
Center for Vaccine Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
9
Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA.
10
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA doconnor@primate.wisc.edu.

Abstract

Wild nonhuman primates are immediate sources and long-term reservoirs of human pathogens. However, ethical and technical challenges have hampered the identification of novel blood-borne pathogens in these animals. We recently examined RNA viruses in plasma from wild African monkeys and discovered several novel, highly divergent viruses belonging to the family Arteriviridae. Close relatives of these viruses, including simian hemorrhagic fever virus, have caused sporadic outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in captive macaque monkeys since the 1960s. However, arterivirus infection in wild nonhuman primates had not been described prior to 2011. The arteriviruses recently identified in wild monkeys have high sequence and host species diversity, maintain high viremia, and are prevalent in affected populations. Taken together, these features suggest that the simian arteriviruses may be "preemergent" zoonotic pathogens. If not, this would imply that biological characteristics of RNA viruses thought to facilitate zoonotic transmission may not, by themselves, be sufficient for such transmission to occur.

PMID:
26559828
PMCID:
PMC4702702
DOI:
10.1128/JVI.01433-15
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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