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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016 May;137(5):1535-44. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.027. Epub 2015 Nov 11.

Persistence and evolution of allergen-specific IgE repertoires during subcutaneous specific immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
2
Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif; Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
3
Department of Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
4
Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
5
Center for Molecular Allergology, IDI-IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Associated Centers for Molecular Allergology, Rome, Italy.
6
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
7
Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif; Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.
8
Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: mats.ohlin@immun.lth.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment with proved long-term curative potential in patients with allergic disease. Allergen-specific IgE is the causative agent of allergic disease, and antibodies contribute to SIT, but the effects of SIT on aeroallergen-specific B-cell repertoires are not well understood.

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to characterize the IgE sequences expressed by allergen-specific B cells and track the fate of these B-cell clones during SIT.

METHODS:

We used high-throughput antibody gene sequencing and identification of allergen-specific IgE with combinatorial antibody fragment library technology to analyze immunoglobulin repertoires of blood and the nasal mucosa from aeroallergen-sensitized subjects before and during the first year of subcutaneous SIT.

RESULTS:

Of 52 distinct allergen-specific IgE heavy chains from 8 allergic donors, 37 were also detected by using high-throughput antibody gene sequencing of blood samples, nasal mucosal samples, or both. The allergen-specific clones had increased persistence, higher likelihood of belonging to clones expressing other switched isotypes, and possibly larger clone size than the rest of the IgE repertoire. Clone members in nasal tissue showed close mutational relationships.

CONCLUSION:

In the future, combining functional binding studies, deep antibody repertoire sequencing, and information on clinical outcomes in larger studies might aid assessment of SIT mechanisms and efficacy.

KEYWORDS:

Aeroallergens; IgE; allergen-specific antibodies; clonotype evolution; immunoglobulin class-switch; local immunity; repertoire; specific immunotherapy

PMID:
26559321
PMCID:
PMC5010428
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2015.09.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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