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J Dent Res. 2016 Feb;95(2):173-9. doi: 10.1177/0022034515616335. Epub 2015 Nov 9.

Vitamin D and Dental Caries in Children.

Author information

1
The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada The Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada umschrot@cc.umanitoba.ca.
2
The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada George Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
3
The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
4
The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada The Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between vitamin D status and dental caries in Canadian school-aged children participating in the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). The CHMS was a national cross-sectional study involving physical assessments, laboratory analysis, and interviews. Analysis was restricted to data for 1,017 children 6 to 11 y of age. Outcome variables included the presence of caries and overall total caries score (dmft/DMFT index). Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were measured from serum samples obtained from participants. Bivariate analysis, logistic regression for the presence of caries, and multiple linear regression for total caries scores were used. Significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Overall, 56.4% of children experienced caries, and the mean dmft/DMFT score was 2.47 (95% CI 2.09 to 2.84). The unadjusted odds of children with 25(OH)D levels ≥75 nmol/L having experienced caries was 0.57 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.82), while the odds for caries at the ≥50 nmol/L level was 0.56 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.89). After controlling for other covariates, backward logistic regression revealed that the presence of caries was significantly associated with 25(OH) levels <75 nmol/L and <50 nmol/L, lower household education, not brushing twice daily, and yearly visits to the dentist. Similarly, multiple linear regression revealed that total dmft/DMFT caries scores were also associated with 25(OH)D concentrations <75 nmol/L, not brushing twice daily, lower household education, and yearly visits to the dentist. Data from a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of Canadian children suggest that there is an association between caries and lower serum vitamin D. Improving children's vitamin D status may be an additional preventive consideration to lower the risk for caries.

KEYWORDS:

Canada; child; dental health surveys; health survey; nutritional status; oral health

PMID:
26553883
DOI:
10.1177/0022034515616335
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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