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Neurobiol Learn Mem. 2015 Dec;126:31-8. doi: 10.1016/j.nlm.2015.10.012. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

A new face of sleep: The impact of post-learning sleep on recognition memory for face-name associations.

Author information

1
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. Electronic address: leonie.maurer@gmx.de.
2
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: kzitting@partners.org.
3
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: elliottkj1@gmail.com.
4
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: cacadmin@partners.org.
5
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: jronda@research.bwh.harvard.edu.
6
Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 221 Longwood Avenue, BLI438, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: jduffy@research.bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Sleep has been demonstrated to improve consolidation of many types of new memories. However, few prior studies have examined how sleep impacts learning of face-name associations. The recognition of a new face along with the associated name is an important human cognitive skill. Here we investigated whether post-presentation sleep impacts recognition memory of new face-name associations in healthy adults. Fourteen participants were tested twice. Each time, they were presented 20 photos of faces with a corresponding name. Twelve hours later, they were shown each face twice, once with the correct and once with an incorrect name, and asked if each face-name combination was correct and to rate their confidence. In one condition the 12-h interval between presentation and recall included an 8-h nighttime sleep opportunity ("Sleep"), while in the other condition they remained awake ("Wake"). There were more correct and highly confident correct responses when the interval between presentation and recall included a sleep opportunity, although improvement between the "Wake" and "Sleep" conditions was not related to duration of sleep or any sleep stage. These data suggest that a nighttime sleep opportunity improves the ability to correctly recognize face-name associations. Further studies investigating the mechanism of this improvement are important, as this finding has implications for individuals with sleep disturbances and/or memory impairments.

KEYWORDS:

Declarative memory; Hippocampal-dependent memory; Recognition memory; Sleep

PMID:
26549626
PMCID:
PMC4666502
DOI:
10.1016/j.nlm.2015.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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