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Cell Rep. 2015 Nov 17;13(7):1319-1326. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.10.014. Epub 2015 Nov 5.

Organization of the Mammalian Ionome According to Organ Origin, Lineage Specialization, and Longevity.

Author information

1
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Bioinspired Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Bioinspired Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750, Republic of Korea; Department of Animal Life Science, College of Animal Life Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do 200-701, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607, USA.
5
Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA.
6
Department of Physiology and The Sam and Ann Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX 78245, USA.
7
Redox Biology Center and Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA.
8
Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: vgladyshev@rics.bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Trace elements are essential to all mammals, but their distribution and utilization across species and organs remains unclear. Here, we examined 18 elements in the brain, heart, kidney, and liver of 26 mammalian species and report the elemental composition of these organs, the patterns of utilization across the species, and their correlation with body mass and longevity. Across the organs, we observed distinct distribution patterns for abundant elements, transition metals, and toxic elements. Some elements showed lineage-specific patterns, including reduced selenium utilization in African mole rats, and positive correlation between the number of selenocysteine residues in selenoprotein P and the selenium levels in liver and kidney across mammals. Body mass was linked positively to zinc levels, whereas species lifespan correlated positively with cadmium and negatively with selenium. This study provides insights into the variation of mammalian ionome by organ physiology, lineage specialization, body mass, and longevity.

PMID:
26549444
PMCID:
PMC4771060
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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