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Psychother Res. 2016 Nov;26(6):653-64. doi: 10.1080/10503307.2015.1104422. Epub 2015 Nov 7.

Therapist activities preceding setbacks in the assimilation process.

Author information

1
a Departamento de Personalidad, Evaluación y Tratamientos Psicológicos , Universidad de Valencia , Valencia , Spain.
2
b Department of Psychology , Miami University , OH , USA.
3
c Department of Psychology , Appalachian State University , NC , USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined the therapist activities immediately preceding assimilation setbacks in the treatment of a good-outcome client treated with linguistic therapy of evaluation (LTE).

METHOD:

Setbacks (N = 105) were defined as decreases of one or more assimilation stages from one passage to the next dealing with the same theme. The therapist activities immediately preceding those setbacks were classified using two kinds of codes: (a) therapist interventions and (b) positions the therapist took toward the client's internal voices.

RESULTS:

Preceding setbacks to early assimilation stages, where the problem was unformulated, the therapist was more often actively listening, and the setbacks were more often attributable to pushing a theme beyond the client's working zone. Preceding setbacks to later assimilation stages, where the problem was at least formulated, the therapist was more likely to be directing clients to consider alternatives, following the LTE agenda, and setbacks were more often attributable to the client following these directives shifting attention to less assimilated (but nevertheless formulated) aspects of the problem.

CONCLUSIONS:

At least in this case, setbacks followed systematically different therapist activities depending on the problem's stage of assimilation. Possible implications for the assimilation model's account of setbacks and for practice are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

assimilation model; balance strategy; setbacks; therapist interventions; therapist positions toward voices; zone of proximal development

PMID:
26549404
DOI:
10.1080/10503307.2015.1104422
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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