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J Oral Rehabil. 2016 Apr;43(4):306-16. doi: 10.1111/joor.12367. Epub 2015 Nov 9.

A systematic review of the comorbidity between Temporomandibular Disorders and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Author information

1
Academic Psychiatry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2
Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
3
Centre for Oral Health Research and Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
4
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
5
Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Abstract

The most common cause of chronic oro-facial pain is a group of disorders collectively termed temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Chronic painful TMD is thought to be a 'central sensitivity syndrome' related to hypersensitivity of the nervous system, but the cause is unknown. A similar understanding is proposed for other unexplained conditions, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Exploring the comorbidity of the two conditions is a valuable first step in identifying potential common aetiological mechanisms or treatment targets.

METHOD:

Systematic literature review. Studies were included if they recruited community or control samples and identified how many reported having both TMD and CFS, or if they recruited a sample of patients with either TMD or CFS and measured the presence of the other condition.

RESULTS:

Six papers met inclusion criteria. In studies of patients with CFS (n = 3), 21-32% reported having TMD. In a sample of people with CFS and fibromyalgia, 50% reported having TMD. Studies in people with TMD (n = 3) reported 0-43% having CFS. Studies in samples recruited from oro-facial pain clinics (n = 2) reported a lower comorbidity with CFS (0-10%) than a study that recruited individuals from a TMD self-help organisation (43%).

CONCLUSION:

The review highlights the limited standard of evidence addressing the comorbidity between oro-facial pain and CFS. There is a valuable signal that the potential overlap in these two conditions could be high; however, studies employing more rigorous methodology including standardised clinical assessments rather than self-report of prior diagnosis are needed.

KEYWORDS:

central sensitivity syndrome; chronic fatigue syndrome; diagnostic overlap; phenotyping; systematic review; temporo-mandibular disorder

PMID:
26549386
DOI:
10.1111/joor.12367
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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