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Patient Educ Couns. 2016 Apr;99(4):638-643. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.10.029. Epub 2015 Nov 2.

Social support and self-management capabilities in diabetes patients: An international observational study.

Author information

1
Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: jan.koetsenruijter@radboudumc.nl.
2
Radboud University Medical Center, Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of IQ Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
NIHR Wessex CLAHRC, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southampton, Hampshire, UK.
4
Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
5
Department of Economic Sociology, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria.
6
University of Oslo, Institute for Health and Society, Oslo, Norway.
7
Education, Health and Society Foundation, Murcia, Spain.
8
School of Nursing, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to explore which aspects of social networks are related to self-management capabilities and if these networks have the potential to reduce the adverse health effects of deprivation.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study we recruited type 2 diabetes patients in six European countries. Data on self-management capabilities was gathered through written questionnaires and data on social networks characteristics and social support through subsequent personal/telephone interviews. We used regression modelling to assess the effect of social support and education on self-management capabilities.

RESULTS:

In total 1692 respondents completed the questionnaire and the interview. Extensive informational networks, emotional networks, and attendance of community organisations were linked to better self-management capabilities. The association of self-management capabilities with informational support was especially strong in the low education group, whereas the association with emotional support was stronger in the high education group.

CONCLUSION:

Some of the social network characteristics showed a positive relation to self-management capabilities. The effect of informational support was strongest in low education populations and may therefore provide a possibility to reduce the adverse impact of low education on self-management capabilities.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Self-management support interventions that take informational support in patients' networks into account may be most effective, especially in deprived populations.

KEYWORDS:

Deprivation; Health education; Health inequalities; HeiQ; Self care; Self-management capabilities; Social support; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
26549171
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.10.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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