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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2016 Mar;97(3):345-354.e15. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2015.10.095. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Comparative Effect of Power Training and High-Speed Yoga on Motor Function in Older Patients With Parkinson Disease.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuromuscular Research and Active Aging, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
2
Laboratory of Neuromuscular Research and Active Aging, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL; Center on Aging, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL. Electronic address: jsignorile@miami.edu.
3
Green Monkey Yoga, Miami, FL.
4
Department of Neurology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.
5
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the effects of power training (PWT) and a high-speed yoga program on physical performances in older patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and to test the hypothesis that both training interventions would attenuate PD symptoms and improve physical performance.

DESIGN:

Randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

A laboratory of neuromuscular research and active aging.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients with PD (N=41; mean age ± SD, 72.2 ± 6.5y).

INTERVENTIONS:

Two high-speed exercise interventions (specifically designed yoga program and PWT) were given for 12 weeks (twice a week), and 1 nonexercise control group.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor score (UPDRSMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Mini-BESTest), Timed Up and Go, functional reach, single leg stance (SLS), postural sway test, 10-m usual and maximal walking speed tests, 1 repetition maximum (RM), and peak power (PPW) for leg press.

RESULTS:

For the posttests, both training groups showed significant improvements (P<.05) in all physical measurements except functional reach on the more affected side, SLS, and postural sway compared with the pretests, and significantly better scores for UPDRSMS, BBS, Mini-BESTest, Timed Up and Go, functional reach on the less affected side, 10-m usual and maximal walking speed tests, 1RM, and PPW than controls, with no differences detected between the yoga program and PWT.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both the specially designed yoga program and PWT programs can significantly improve physical performance in older persons with PD.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Exercise therapy; Muscle strength; Postural balance; Rehabilitation; Resistance training

PMID:
26546987
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2015.10.095
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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