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Ophthalmology. 2016 Feb;123(2):352-60. doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2015.09.046. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Association between Antiplatelet or Anticoagulant Drugs and Retinal or Subretinal Hemorrhage in the Comparison of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: gsying@mail.med.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Program in Life Sciences and Management, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
4
Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the association between use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs and retinal or subretinal hemorrhage in participants with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in the Comparison of AMD Treatments Trials (CATT).

DESIGN:

Cohort study within CATT.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants in CATT with untreated active neovascular AMD (n = 1185).

METHODS:

Participants were interviewed for use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs. Trained readers evaluated photographs for the presence and size of retinal or subretinal hemorrhage at baseline and years 1 and 2. Associations between use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs and hemorrhage were evaluated among all participants and by baseline hypertension status using multivariate logistic regression models.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Odds ratio for association with antiplatelet or anticoagulant use.

RESULTS:

Among 1165 participants with gradable photographs, 724 (62.1%) had retinal or subretinal hemorrhage at baseline; 84.4% of hemorrhages were 1 disc area (DA) or less, 8.1% were 1 to 2 DA, and 7.5% were more than 2 DA. At baseline, 608 participants (52.2%) used antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs, including 514 participants (44.1%) using antiplatelets only, 77 (6.6%) using anticoagulants only, and 17 (1.5%) using both. Hemorrhage was present in 64.5% of antiplatelet or anticoagulant users and in 59.6% of nonusers (P = 0.09; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-1.51; P = 0.21). Neither presence nor size of baseline hemorrhage was associated with the type, dose, or duration of antiplatelet or anticoagulant use. Forty-four of 1078 participants (4.08%) had retinal or subretinal hemorrhage detected on 1- or 2-year photographs; these hemorrhages were not associated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant use at baseline (P = 0.28) or during follow-up (P = 0.64). Among participants with hypertension (n = 807), antiplatelet or anticoagulant use was associated with a higher rate of hemorrhage at baseline (66.8% vs. 56.4%; adjusted OR, 1.48; P = 0.01), but not size of retinal or subretinal hemorrhage (P = 0.41).

CONCLUSIONS:

Most retinal or subretinal hemorrhages in eyes enrolled in CATT were less than 1 DA. Among all CATT participants, antiplatelet or anticoagulant use was not associated significantly with hemorrhage, but it was associated significantly with hemorrhage in participants with hypertension.

PMID:
26545320
PMCID:
PMC4724480
DOI:
10.1016/j.ophtha.2015.09.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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