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J Aging Phys Act. 2016 Jul;24(3):376-83. doi: 10.1123/japa.2014-0298. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

The Effects of Pilates Training on Balance Control and Self-Reported Health Status in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effect of a group-based Pilates training program on balance control and health status in healthy older adults.

DESIGN:

A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

SETTING:

General community.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 88 community-dwelling older adults (age 71.15 ± 4.30 years), without evidence of functional balance impairment, were recruited and allocated at random to a Pilates intervention group (n = 44) or a control group (n = 44).

INTERVENTION:

The Pilates intervention group received 36 training sessions over three months (3 sessions a week), while the control group did not receive any intervention.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Standing upright postural stability, performance-based measures of balance, and self-reported health status was assessed in both groups at baseline and at the end of the intervention period.

RESULTS:

Compared with the control group, the Pilates intervention did not improve postural stability, baseline functional measures of balance, or health status.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results suggest that because Pilates training is not task specific, it does not improve balance control or balance function in independent older adults.

PMID:
26540737
DOI:
10.1123/japa.2014-0298
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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