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PLoS One. 2015 Nov 5;10(11):e0142388. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142388. eCollection 2015.

The Prevalence of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Diverse Geographical and Ethnocultural Regions: The COSMIC Collaboration.

Author information

1
Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
2
Dementia Collaborative Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
3
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
4
MRC Biostatistics Unit, Institute of Public Health, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
5
Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
6
Saul B. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
8
Inserm, U1061 Nervous System Pathologies: Epidemiological and Clinical Research, La Colombière Hospital, Montpellier Cedex 5, France.
9
Université de Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France.
10
Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, St Mary's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.
11
Department of Psychiatry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
12
Department of Psychiatry, Tai Po Hospital, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
13
GolgiCenci Foundation, Abbiategrasso (Milan), Italy.
14
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
15
Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
16
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
17
Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States of America.
18
Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States of America.
19
Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
20
Gerontology Research Programme, Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
21
The Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
22
The Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
23
The Division of Epidemiology, Joseph P. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
24
The Department of Neurology, Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
25
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Ministry of Science and Innovation, Madrid, Spain.
26
Department of Medicine and Psychiatry, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.
27
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Madrid, Spain.
28
Department of Microbiology, Preventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Changes in criteria and differences in populations studied and methodology have produced a wide range of prevalence estimates for mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

METHODS:

Uniform criteria were applied to harmonized data from 11 studies from USA, Europe, Asia and Australia, and MCI prevalence estimates determined using three separate definitions of cognitive impairment.

RESULTS:

The published range of MCI prevalence estimates was 5.0%-36.7%. This was reduced with all cognitive impairment definitions: performance in the bottom 6.681% (3.2%-10.8%); Clinical Dementia Rating of 0.5 (1.8%-14.9%); Mini-Mental State Examination score of 24-27 (2.1%-20.7%). Prevalences using the first definition were 5.9% overall, and increased with age (P < .001) but were unaffected by sex or the main races/ethnicities investigated (Whites and Chinese). Not completing high school increased the likelihood of MCI (P ≤ .01).

CONCLUSION:

Applying uniform criteria to harmonized data greatly reduced the variation in MCI prevalence internationally.

PMID:
26539987
PMCID:
PMC4634954
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0142388
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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