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Int J Cancer. 2016 Apr 1;138(7):1670-9. doi: 10.1002/ijc.29914. Epub 2015 Nov 20.

Association of Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus with colorectal cancer: Serological evidence.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular Diagnostics of Oncogenic Infections, Infection, Inflammation and Cancer Program, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
2
Servicio De Microbiología, Hospital Universitario Ramón Y Cajal and Instituto Ramón Y Cajal De Investigaciones Sanitarias (IRYCIS), Madrid, Spain.
3
Red Española De Investigación En Patología Infecciosa (REIPI), Madrid, Spain.
4
CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain.
5
Environmental and Cancer Epidemiology Unit, National Center of Epidemiology, Instituto De Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
6
Oncology and Hematology Area, IIS Puerta De Hierro, Cancer Epidemiology Research Group, Madrid, Spain.
7
Universidad De León, León, Spain.
8
Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, IDIBELL, Institut Català D'oncologica L'hospitalet De Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.
9
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
10
National School of Public Health, Instituto De Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
11
IDIVAL-University of Cantabria, Santander, Spain.
12
Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain.
13
Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Pamplona, Spain.
14
IUOPA, Universidad De Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.
15
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Biodonostia Research Institute, San Sebastian, Spain.
16
Servicio De Medicina Digestiva, Hospital Univesitario Dr. Peset, Universidad De Valencia, Valencia, Spain.
17
Centro De Investigación En Salud Y Medio Ambiente (CYSMA), Universidad De Huelva, Huelva, Spain.
18
Hospital General De Riotinto, Huelva, Spain.
19
Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria De Granada (Ibs.GRANADA), Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain.
20
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain.
21
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.
22
IMIM (Hospital Del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain.
23
Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
24
School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
25
Department of Pathology, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
26
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Nijmegen Institute for Infection, Inflammation and Immunity (N4i) & Radboud University Centre for Oncology (RUCO), Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The colonic opportunist Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG) is potentially associated with colorectal cancer (CRC). Large-scale seroepidemiological data for SGG antibodies and their possible association with CRC is currently missing. Associations between CRC and antibody responses to SGG were examined in 576 CRC cases and 576 controls matched by sex, age and province from a population-based multicase-control project (MCC-Spain). MCC-Spain was conducted between 2008 and 2013 in 12 Spanish provinces. Antibody responses to recombinant affinity-purified SGG pilus proteins Gallo1569, 2039, 2178 and 2179 were analysed by multiplex serology. Polyomavirus (PyV) JC VP1 and PyV 6 VP1 proteins served as disease-specificity controls. In the control population, antibody responses to pilus proteins were mostly weak. Antibody responses to individual pilus proteins Gallo2039 (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.09-2.28), Gallo2178 (OR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.09-2.30) and Gallo2179 (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.00-2.11) were significantly associated with CRC risk. The association was stronger for positivity to two or more pilus proteins of Gallo1569, Gallo2178 and Gallo2179 (OR:1.93, 95% CI: 1.04-3.56) and for double-positivity to Gallo2178 and Gallo2179 (OR: 3.54, 95% CI: 1.49-8.44). The association between SGG infection and CRC risk was stronger among individuals younger than 65 years. For the first time we demonstrated a statistically significant association of exposure to SGG antigens and CRC in a large seroepidemiological study. These results should stimulate further studies on the role of SGG in CRC pathogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

antibodies; case-control study; epidemiology; gastrointestinal cancer; infection; pilus protein

PMID:
26537841
DOI:
10.1002/ijc.29914
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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