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Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Oct;59(5):470-3. doi: 10.1590/2359-3997000000118.

Effectiveness of a serious game for medical education on insulin therapy: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Departamento de Clínica Médica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR, Brasil.
2
Centro de Educação e Pesquisa, Hospital do Coração, Londrina, PR, Brasil.
3
Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Maringá, PR, Brasil.
4
Complexo Pequeno Príncipe, Curitiba, PR, Brasil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We report the preliminary assessment of InsuOnline©, a serious game designed for medical education on insulin therapy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We conducted a pilot study with 41 undergraduate medical students and Internal Medicine residents to assess the educational effectiveness of InsuOnline©, as compared to a traditional educational activity (lecture, cases discussion). Knowledge, skills and beliefs on insulin therapy were evaluated by a questionnaire applied before, immediately after, and 3 months after both interventions.

RESULTS:

Mean knowledge/skills score was improved from 68% to 89% in traditional education group (n = 23; p < 0.001), and from 61% to 90% in game group (n = 18; p < 0.001). After 3 months, mean score decreased (to 80% in traditional education group, and to 78% in game group; p < 0.001 for both) but remained significantly higher than at baseline in both groups (p < 0.001 for both). Although mean score was lower in game group than in traditional education group at baseline (p = 0.04), no difference remained between groups either immediately or 3 months post-intervention. Score increment was better with the game (29%) than with traditional education (21%; p = 0.04). Beliefs improved in the game group only.

CONCLUSIONS:

InsuOnline© is at least as effective as a traditional educational activity for medical education on insulin therapy, and it can a good option for large-scale continuing medical education on diabetes.

PMID:
26537410
DOI:
10.1590/2359-3997000000118
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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