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Expert Rev Mol Diagn. 2015;15(12):1577-88. doi: 10.1586/14737159.2015.1109450. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

The diagnostic and prognostic potential of plasma extracellular vesicles for cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
a Laboratory of Experimental Cardiology , University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht , the Netherlands.
2
b The Netherlands Heart Institute (ICIN) , Utrecht , the Netherlands.
3
c Department of Cardiology , UMC Utrecht , Utrecht , the Netherlands.
4
d Cardiac Department , National University Heart Centre, National University Hospital , Singapore, Singapore.
5
e Department of Surgery, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine , National University of Singapore , Singapore, Singapore.
6
f Cardiovascular Research Institute , National University Health System , Singapore, Singapore.
7
g Department of Cardiology , Meander Medical Center , Amersfoort , The Netherlands.
8
h Institute of Medical Biology , A-Star, Biopolis , Singapore, Singapore.
9
i School of Biological Sciences , Nanyang Technological University , Singapore, Singapore.
10
j National Heart Centre Singapore, Singapore General Hospital , Duke-National University , Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide and its prevalence is expected to rise rapidly worldwide in the coming decades. Atherosclerosis, the syndrome underlying CVD, is a chronic progressive disease of the arteries already present at a young age. Strokes, heart attacks and heart failure are acute CVD events that occur after decades, however, and require timely diagnosis and treatment. Plasma extracellular vesicles (EVs) are microstructures with a lipid bilayer membrane involved in hemostasis, inflammation and injury. Both EV-counts and EV-content are associated with CVD and the identification of plasma EVs is a novel source of blood-based biomarkers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis of CVD. Presented in this review is an overview of the current use of EVs in CVD and a discussion of the need for robust and easy isolation technologies for plasma EV subsets. This is needed to bring this promising field towards clinical application in the patient.

KEYWORDS:

Plasma extracellular vesicles; biomarker; cardiovascular disease; flow cytometry; microparticles; vesicle content; vesicle counts

PMID:
26535492
DOI:
10.1586/14737159.2015.1109450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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