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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2230-48. doi: 10.1007/s11356-015-5697-7. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Mechanisms of biochar-mediated alleviation of toxicity of trace elements in plants: a critical review.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Government College University, Allama Iqbal Road, 38000, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
2
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Government College University, Allama Iqbal Road, 38000, Faisalabad, Pakistan. shafaqataligill@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Soil Sciences, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan.
4
Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, 38040, Pakistan.
5
Korea Biochar Research Centre and Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, 200-701, South Korea.

Abstract

Trace elements (TEs) contamination is one of the main abiotic stresses which limit plant growth and deteriorate the food quality by their entry into food chain. In recent, biochar (BC) soil amendment has been widely reported for the reduction of TE(s) uptake and toxicity in plants. This review summarizes the role of BC in enhancing TE(s) tolerance in plants. Under TE(s) stress, BC application increased plant growth, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, grain yield, and quality. The key mechanisms evoked are immobilization of TE(s) in the soil, increase in soil pH, alteration of TE(s) redox state in the soil, and improvement in soil physical and biological properties under TE(s) stress. However, these mechanisms vary with plant species, genotypes, growth conditions, duration of stress imposed, BC type, and preparation methods. This review highlights the potential for improving plant resistance to TE(s) stress by BC application and provides a theoretical basis for application of BC in TE(s) contaminated soils worldwide.

KEYWORDS:

Abiotic stress; Biochar; Immobilization; Plants; Tolerance; pH

PMID:
26531712
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-015-5697-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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