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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2015 Nov;23(11):2157-64. doi: 10.1002/oby.21306.

Maternal high-fat diet and obesity impact palatable food intake and dopamine signaling in nonhuman primate offspring.

Author information

1
Division of Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolism, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, Oregon, USA.
2
Department of Biology, University of Portland, Portland, Oregon, USA.
3
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Beaverton, Oregon, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To utilize a nonhuman primate model to examine the impact of maternal high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and pre-pregnancy obesity on offspring intake of palatable food and to examine whether maternal HFD consumption impaired development of the dopamine system, critical for the regulation of hedonic feeding.

METHODS:

The impact of exposure to maternal HFD and obesity on offspring consumption of diets of varying composition was assessed after weaning. The influence of maternal HFD consumption on the development of the prefrontal cortex-dopaminergic system at 13 months of age was also examined.

RESULTS:

During a preference test, offspring exposed to maternal HFD consumption and obesity displayed increased intake of food high in fat and sugar content relative to offspring from lean control mothers. Maternal HFD consumption suppressed offspring dopamine signaling (as assessed by immunohistochemistry) relative to control offspring. Specifically, there was decreased abundance of dopamine fibers and of dopamine receptor 1 and 2 proteins.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study reveals that offspring exposed to both maternal HFD consumption and maternal obesity during early development are at increased risk for obesity due to overconsumption of palatable energy-dense food, a behavior that may be related to reduced central dopamine signaling.

PMID:
26530932
PMCID:
PMC4636015
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21306
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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