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Nutrition. 2016 Feb;32(2):260-4. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2015.08.018. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Joint association of fruit, vegetable, and heterocyclic amine intake with DNA damage levels in a general population.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
2
School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
3
Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
4
School of Public Health, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: marchioni@usp.br.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess joint effects of heterocyclic amine (HCA), fruit, and vegetable intake on DNA damage in a general population.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional survey (ISA-Capital) was performed among adults and older adults in Brazil. We selected 73 participants with high HCA intake and 73 sex- and age-matched participants with non-HCA intake (n = 146) for the present study. Diet was assessed by a 24-h dietary recall and a structured questionnaire with cooking methods and levels of meat doneness. DNA damage was measured by 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). The association between DNA damage and dietary intake was analyzed by linear regression models.

RESULTS:

Fruit intake showed significantly inverse association with 8-OHdG (β, -0.787; P = 0.035), whereas HCA intake was significantly associated with increased DNA damage (β, 1.621; P = 0.036) after adjusting for covariates, including sex, age, body mass index, energy intake, smoking, physical activity, and C-reactive protein. Vegetable intake was not significantly associated with 8-OHdG. We also found a significant association between joint fruit and HCA intake and DNA damage, and the difference in 8-OHdG levels was significantly higher between participants with the lowest fruit intake and highest HCA intake and those with the highest fruit intake and non-HCA intake (P = 0.049).

CONCLUSIONS:

Lower intake of fruits and higher intake of HCAs were associated with higher DNA damage levels and showed an additive effect pattern.

KEYWORDS:

DNA adducts; DNA damage; Fruit; Heterocyclic amines; Risk of cancer

PMID:
26530455
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2015.08.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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