Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nutr J. 2015 Nov 3;14:116. doi: 10.1186/s12937-015-0106-0.

Low-FODMAP formula improves diarrhea and nutritional status in hospitalized patients receiving enteral nutrition: a randomized, multicenter, double-blind clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science Nutrition, Dong-A University, Brain Busan 21 Project, Busan, 604-714, Republic of Korea. yunsora0917@naver.com.
2
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dong-A University Hospital, Busan, South Korea. jhlee08@dau.ac.kr.
3
Department of Food Science Nutrition, Dong-A University, Brain Busan 21 Project, Busan, 604-714, Republic of Korea. wogid5626@naver.com.
4
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Dong-A University Hospital, Busan, South Korea. ssdkg125@hanmail.net.
5
Central Research Institute, Dr. Chung's Foods Co., Ltd., Cheongju, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea. ohkite@hanmail.net.
6
Central Research Institute, Dr. Chung's Foods Co., Ltd., Cheongju, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea. lyb007@vegemil.co.kr.
7
Central Research Institute, Dr. Chung's Foods Co., Ltd., Cheongju, Chungbuk, Republic of Korea. 82jgh@vegemil.co.kr.
8
Department of Food Science Nutrition, Dong-A University, Brain Busan 21 Project, Busan, 604-714, Republic of Korea. oykim@dau.ac.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) are poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates that play an important role in inducing functional gut symptoms. A low-FODMAP diet improves abdominal symptoms in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. However, there were no study for the effect of FODMAP content on gastrointestinal intolerance and nutritional status in patients receiving enteral nutrition (EN).

METHODS:

In this randomized, multicenter, double-blind, 14-day clinical trial, eligible hospitalized patients receiving EN (n = 100) were randomly assigned to three groups; 84 patients completed the trial (low-FODMAP EN, n = 30; moderate-FODMAP EN, n = 28; high-FODMAP EN, n = 26). Anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured; stool assessment was performed using the King's Stool Chart and clinical definition.

RESULTS:

Baseline values were not significantly different among the three groups. After the 14-day intervention, diarrhea significantly improved in the low-FODMAP group than in the moderate- and high-FODMAP groups (P < 0.05). King's Stool scores in diarrhea subjects were significantly and steadily reduced in the low-FODMAP group compared with the other two groups (P for time and EN type interaction <0.05). BMI increased significantly in the low- and high-FODMAP groups during the intervention (P < 0.05 for both), and showed a trend toward increasing in the moderate-FODMAP group (P < 0.10). Serum prealbumin increased significantly in all groups by 14-day; by 3-day, it had increased to the levels at 14-day in the low-FODMAP group. At 14-day, serum transferrin had increased significantly in the moderate-FODMAP group. In addition, subjects were classified by final condition (unimproved, normal maintenance, diarrhea only improved, constipation only improved, and recurrent diarrhea/constipation improved). Seventy-five percent of the diarrhea improved group consumed the low-FODMAP EN formula. 38.5 and 46.2% of recurrent diarrhea/constipation improved group consumed the low- and moderate-FODMAP EN respectively. BMI significantly increased in all groups except the unimproved. Prealbumin levels significantly increased in the diarrhea-improved and recurrent diarrhea/constipation groups at 3-day and continued by 14-day, and in the constipation-improved group at 14-day. Transferrin levels significantly increased in the diarrhea-improved and recurrent diarrhea/constipation groups at 14-day.

CONCLUSION:

Low-FODMAP EN may improve diarrhea, leading to improved nutritional status and facilitating prompt recovery from illness.

PMID:
26530312
PMCID:
PMC4632275
DOI:
10.1186/s12937-015-0106-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center