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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Jan;101(1):79-88. doi: 10.1210/jc.2015-2706. Epub 2015 Nov 3.

Relating Phthalate and BPA Exposure to Metabolism in Peripubescence: The Role of Exposure Timing, Sex, and Puberty.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health Sciences (D.J.W., K.K.F., J.D.M.), School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Nutritional Sciences (K.E.P.), School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Center for Human Growth and Development (K.E.P.), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; Department of Nutrition (K.E.P.), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; and Center for Nutrition and Health Research (A.M.-G., M.T.y.O., A.C., M.M.T.-R.), National Institute of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62508 Mexico.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals during development may play a role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents by interfering with metabolic homeostasis.

OBJECTIVE:

To explore associations between in utero and peripubertal urinary phthalate metabolite and bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations and markers of peripubertal metabolic homeostasis.

DESIGN:

Early Life Exposure in Mexico to Environmental Toxicants (ELEMENT): a longitudinal cohort study of pregnant women in Mexico City and their offspring.

SETTING:

Public maternity hospitals in Mexico City.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS:

Women recruited during pregnancy; offspring recruited for follow-up at age 8-14 years (n = 250).

INTERVENTIONS:

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Fasting serum c-peptide, IGF-1, leptin, and glucose concentrations among children at follow-up; calculated measures of insulin secretion and insulin resistance.

RESULTS:

Phthalate metabolites and BPA were associated with metabolism biomarkers at age 8-14 years in patterns that varied by sex, pubertal status, and exposure timing. For example, in utero monoethyl phthalate was associated with lower insulin secretion among pubertal boys (P = .02) and higher leptin among girls (P = .04). In utero di-2-ethylhexyl phthlate was associated with higher IGF-1 among pubertal girls; peripubertal di-2-ethylhexyl phthlate was associated with higher IGF-1, insulin secretion, and resistance among prepubertal girls. In contrast, peripubertal dibutyl phthalate, monobenzyl phthalate, and mono-3-carboxypropyl phthalate were associated with lower IGF-1 among pubertal boys. Peripubertal BPA was associated with higher leptin in boys (P = .01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Considering the long-term health effects related to metabolic syndrome, additional research on exposure and metabolic outcomes across developmental periods and early adulthood is needed.

PMID:
26529628
PMCID:
PMC4701847
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2015-2706
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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