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Vaccine. 2015 Nov 27;33(48):6629-34. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.10.096. Epub 2015 Nov 1.

Pediatric provider vaccine hesitancy: An under-recognized obstacle to immunizing children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, United States. Electronic address: suryadem@upstate.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, United States.
3
Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe vaccine attitudes among pediatric healthcare providers attending immunization conferences.

STUDY DESIGN:

Attendees of 5 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)-sponsored vaccine conferences held between June and November 2013 anonymously completed a questionnaire assessing vaccine attitudes and practices prior to the opening of educational sessions. Pearson's chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests were used to analyze associations between vaccine attitudes, vaccine practices and provider characteristics.

RESULTS:

680 providers attending AAP-sponsored vaccine conferences were included. 661/666 (99%) enrolled providers state they routinely recommend standard pediatric vaccines, yet, 30 (5%) state that they do not routinely recommend influenza and/or human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. These providers expressed vaccine safety (87/680 (13%)) and efficacy (21/680 (31%)) concerns and stated belief in vaccine misperceptions: vaccine causes autism (34/668, 5%), multiple vaccines at a single visit reduces vaccine efficacy (43/680, 6%) or overwhelms the immune system (63/680, 9%), and administering HPV vaccine will increase the likelihood of unprotected adolescent sexual activity (29/680, 4%). Six percent of providers who do not routinely recommend all pediatric vaccines correctly identified themselves as vaccine hesitant.

CONCLUSION:

Vaccine hesitancy is under-recognized among pediatric providers attending AAP-sponsored immunization conferences. Educational interventions tailored to address provider vaccine concerns are needed to improve provider vaccine confidence.

KEYWORDS:

Pediatric vaccine; Vaccine attitudes; Vaccine hesitancy

PMID:
26529071
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.10.096
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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