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PLoS One. 2015 Nov 3;10(11):e0142136. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142136. eCollection 2015.

Etiology of Childhood Infectious Diarrhea in a Developed Region of China: Compared to Childhood Diarrhea in a Developing Region and Adult Diarrhea in a Developed Region.

Author information

1
Institute of Basic Medicine Science, Chinese Academy of Medicine Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medicine College, Beijing, China; National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Infectious Disease, Dongcheng Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Infectious Disease, Henan Provincial Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, Zhengzhou, China.
4
National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, Beijing, China.
5
Institute of Basic Medicine Science, Chinese Academy of Medicine Sciences, School of Basic Medicine, Peking Union Medicine College, Beijing, China.

Abstract

In China, great differences in economy, social characteristics and hygiene exist between developing and developed regions. A comparative study of infectious diarrhea between two regions was needed. Three groups of diarrheal patients were collected: children ≤5 year-olds from Beijing (developed region) and Henan Province (developing region), and adults over 18 year-olds from Beijing. A questionnaire was used to survey and feces samples were examined for 16 enteropathogens. We enrolled 1422 children and 1047 adults from developed region and 755 children from developing region. Virus positive rates were 32.98% for children and 23.67% for adults in developed region. The most prevalent pathogen for children was rotavirus whereas for adults was norovirus. Bacterial isolation rates were 13.92% for children from developed region, while 29.14% for children from the developing regions. For the greatest difference, Shigella accounted for 50.79% and was the dominant pathogen in the developing region, whereas in the developed region it was only 1.45%. There was no significant relationship between the local levels of development with diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC) categories. But it was seen the notable differences between the population with different age: enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E.coli (EAggEC) were the primary classes of DEC in children from both regions, whereas it was enterotoxigenic E.coli (ETEC) in adults. The symptoms of Shigella and Salmonella infection, such as bloody stools, white blood cells (WBC) and red blood cells (RBC) positivity and fever were similar in children, which may lead to the misidentification. Yersinia enterocolitica and shiga toxin-producing E.coli (STEC) infections were firstly reported in Beijing. There was a large difference in etiology of bacterial diarrhea between children in developing and developed regions of China.

PMID:
26528820
PMCID:
PMC4631449
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0142136
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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