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Diabet Med. 2016 Nov;33(11):1582-1589. doi: 10.1111/dme.13022. Epub 2015 Dec 8.

Suicidal ideation reported by adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes: results from Diabetes MILES-Australia.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW. tonelle.handley@newcastle.edu.au.
2
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Randwick, NSW. tonelle.handley@newcastle.edu.au.
3
The Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes, Diabetes Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria.
4
Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development, School of Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria.
5
School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW.
6
Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton, NSW, Australia.
7
Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, CoRPS, Tilburg University, The Netherlands.
8
AHP Research, Hornchurch, UK.

Abstract

AIMS:

To examine the prevalence and correlates of suicidal ideation (SI) in a community-based sample of adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

Participants were 3338 adults aged 18-70 years with Type 1 diabetes (n = 1376) or Type 2 diabetes (non-insulin: n = 1238; insulin: n = 724) from a national survey administered to a random sample registered with the National Diabetes Services Scheme. Depression and SI were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, and diabetes-specific distress with the Problem Areas In Diabetes scale. Separate logistic regression analyses by diabetes type/treatment were used to determine relative contribution to SI.

RESULTS:

Overall, we observed a SI rate of 14% in our sample. Participants with Type 2 diabetes using insulin reported more frequent depressive symptoms, and were more likely to report recent SI (19%) compared with those with either Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes not using insulin (14 and 12%, respectively). After controlling for depression, there was little difference in the prevalence of SI between diabetes types/treatments, but higher diabetes-specific distress significantly increased the odds of SI.

CONCLUSIONS:

As SI is a significant risk factor for a suicide attempt, the findings have implications for healthcare professionals, pointing to the importance of adequate screening and action plans for appropriate follow-up of those reporting depression. Our findings are also indicative of the psychological toll of diabetes more generally, and the need to integrate physical and mental healthcare for people with diabetes.

PMID:
26525943
DOI:
10.1111/dme.13022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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