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Nature. 2015 Nov 5;527(7576):105-9. doi: 10.1038/nature15548. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Autophagy mediates degradation of nuclear lamina.

Author information

1
Epigenetics Program, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
2
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611, USA.
3
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA.
4
Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow and Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK.
5
Department of Biochemistry &Biophysics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
6
Molecular Cancer Research Group, Institute of Medical Biology, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway.
7
Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.
8
Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

Abstract

Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a catabolic membrane trafficking process that degrades a variety of cellular constituents and is associated with human diseases. Although extensive studies have focused on autophagic turnover of cytoplasmic materials, little is known about the role of autophagy in degrading nuclear components. Here we report that the autophagy machinery mediates degradation of nuclear lamina components in mammals. The autophagy protein LC3/Atg8, which is involved in autophagy membrane trafficking and substrate delivery, is present in the nucleus and directly interacts with the nuclear lamina protein lamin B1, and binds to lamin-associated domains on chromatin. This LC3-lamin B1 interaction does not downregulate lamin B1 during starvation, but mediates its degradation upon oncogenic insults, such as by activated RAS. Lamin B1 degradation is achieved by nucleus-to-cytoplasm transport that delivers lamin B1 to the lysosome. Inhibiting autophagy or the LC3-lamin B1 interaction prevents activated RAS-induced lamin B1 loss and attenuates oncogene-induced senescence in primary human cells. Our study suggests that this new function of autophagy acts as a guarding mechanism protecting cells from tumorigenesis.

PMID:
26524528
PMCID:
PMC4824414
DOI:
10.1038/nature15548
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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